Post-Stroke and Brain Injury Concerns

After a stroke or brain injury, a person may face a variety of challenges. Every survivor is unique and may exhibit different impairments. Most are common and will improve with time and rehabilitation. Below is a list of possible challenges stroke survivors may exhibit. Some may struggle with many of these, while others may be affected by fewer of them.

Physical Conditions

  • Weakness, paralysis, and problems with balance or coordination
  • Pain, numbness, or burning and tingling sensations
  • Fatigue, which may continue after a person returns home
  • Inattention to one side of the body, also known as neglect; in extreme cases, you may not be aware of your arm or leg
  • Urinary or bowel incontinence 
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Memory problems, poor attention span, or difficulty solving problems
  • Visual problems
  • Difficulty recognizing limitations caused by the stroke 

Communication Challenges

Cognitive Problems

  • Difficulty maintaining attention
  • Memory loss
  • Trouble with insight and making judgments
  • Disorganization
  • Disorientation
  • Trouble processing information
  • Difficulty with problem solving
  • Reasoning
  • Difficulty with executive functioning (planning, focusing attention, remembering instructions, and managing multiple tasks successfully)

Emotional and Behavioral Changes

  • Sudden mood changes
  • Feeling anxious, worried, pessimistic, or hopeless
  • Isolating one’s self from others
  • Having thoughts of death
  • Loss of energy
  • Increase or decrease in appetite
  • Difficulty sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, thinking, or making decisions
  • Headache
  • Digestive problems
  • Sexual problems

 

Talk to your doctor if your loved one is exhibiting any signs of depression. Antidepressant medicine may be available, or it may be better to get a referral for a psychologist or psychiatrist.

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